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News

 

June 2014

  • The brown marmorated stinkbug is moving west. A national program at Rutgers New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station is involved in identifying and reporting new discoveries of this invasive pest. Reports may be made directly to the website link, although we recommend working with your local experts (see the About page on our website for contact information in your area) first to confirm the pest is present. Bill Ree is a local expert who can be contacted regarding this pest on pecan in Texas.

May 2014

  • Protect your orchard from offsite pesticide drift by using the Texas Crop Registry: Pesticides are an important tool for agriculture. But pesticides applied to one crop have the potential to drift and cause damage to surrounding crops. For example, a pecan orchard located next to a field crop may be at risk from broad-spectrum herbicides used for early season weed control. In recent years the risk from pesticide drift has increased with the widespread use of herbicide tolerant crops.

    The Texas Crop Registry is designed to protect growers and pesticide applicators in Texas by maintaining maps of crop locations at risk to pesticide drift. Pesticide applicators can use these maps to assess whether any precautions should be taken to reduce drift. The registry is free and easy to use: simply register with the site then enter the location of your pecan orchard(s) or any other at risk crops.

  • The time to put out pecan nut casebearer pheromone traps is rapidly approaching, or even here for our most southerly producers in the pecan belt. The list of suppliers below is provided for your use and we also would like you to join our PNC Cooperator Program to aid the industry in Risk Assessement for this important pest.
    List of Suppliers [PDF]

April 2014

  • El Paso County Agrilife Extension Center IPM Newsletter is now available in the library.

  • The Pecan Scab Risk Assessment Map tool will not be operational in 2014 due to a lack of funds to maintain the integrity of the real-time data input/output processing required to continue to provide this service. Previous histories for 2011-2013 provide a ”proof of concept” and can be made available for reference purposes. The tool can be reinstated if/when resources can be found to update and maintain it.

October 2013

  • The Pecan, A History of America's Native Nut by acclaimed writer and historian James McWilliams explores the history of our most important commercial nut from its beginnings as a food source for native Americans to its present status as a valued global commodity. University of Texas Press, October 2013.

  • Register online now for the 2014 Texas Pecan Short Course. 
    Dates:  8:00 am on Monday, January 27, 2014 through noon Friday, January 31
    Location: Room 601, Rudder Tower, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas

Looking for an old news item? Try the News Archive

Pest Alerts

 

August 2014

Pecan weevil alert...>> read more

August 2013

Pecan Weevil Alert
Pecan weevil management decision-making is upon us. Note that many pecan growing areas are facing drought conditions.  This may result in drought-delayed emergence well beyond the normal emergence time for this pest, particularly in orchards and groves with clay soils.
Read more >>>

June 2013


A colony of walnut caterpillars.
Walnut caterpillar colony
Walnut caterpillar, 5th instar stage
Walnut caterpillar, 5th instar stage
Walnut caterpillar infestation
Walnut caterpillars on tree

Bill Ree reports walnut caterpillar activity on pecan. Pecan producers or those with urban pecan trees should be watching for this insect. The real damage will occur when the larvae reach the 5th (last) instar. This is the stage when the larvae is black with long white hairs (pictured). These insects can defoliate a tree in 3 - 4 days.

Infestation signs:

  • colonies on branch terminals
  • a mass of cast skins on the main trunk or scaffold limbs
  • a lot of frass on sidewalks or driveways
  • branch terminals with missing foliage but leaf rachis still in tact 

Control options:

  • For homeowners - Bt-based insecticides and products with spinosad (ex: Green Light Lawn and Garden with Spinosad)
  • For commercial producers - Intrepid, Confirm, Belt, Delegate are preferred.
  • For organic producers - Entrust, certified Bt insecticides, Azera and Neemix

August 2012

July 2012

May 2012

  • Walnut Caterpillar Alert
    Walnut caterpillars in pecan tree
  • May 15 -- Producers should be on the lookout for walnut caterpillars starting to lay eggs in the next generation in about 3 weeks and then expect one more generations to occur about 6 weeks after that. Walnut caterpillars have been found as 4th instar larvae and are occurring earlier than usual in Victoria (Victoria County) and Cuero (DeWitt County), Texas. Photo credit:  Howard Arnett

August 2011

  • Pecan Weevil Alert
    Pecan weevil management decision-making is upon us. Note that many pecan growing areas are facing drought conditions.  This may result in drought-delayed emergence well beyond the normal emergence time for this pest, particularly in orchards and groves with clay soils.
    Read more >>>

June 2011

  • Stinkbug ALERT
    A Regional Pest Alert has been issued for the brown marmorated stinkbug. Please see this publication for important information.
    Brown marmorated stinkbug.  Adult female.

August 2010

  • Pecan Weevil Alert
    Pecan weevil management decision-making is already upon us. Note that many pecan growing areas are facing dry conditions, and this may result in drought-delayed emergence well beyond the normal emergence time for this pest, particularly in orchards and groves with clay soils.
    Read more >>>
  • Thousand Cankers Disease of Black Walnut
    This disease reported found in Tennessee July 26, 2010. (See companion materials listed below for details.)  Based on limited research, pecan is not known to be at risk from this disease. Scientists at Colorado State University will provide expert assistance if this disease is suspected present and local scientists should also be informed.
    • Thousand Cankers Disease, USDA Forest Service Pest Alert
    • Economic Loss Associated with the Introduction of Thousand Cankers Disease of Black Walnut to Kansas, Kansas Forest Service, Kansas State University
    • July 26 alert, Walnut twig beetle and Geosmithia sp. nov. found in Tennessee, Department of Bioagricultural Sciences and Pest Management, Colorado State University
    • Colorado State University website on Thousand Cankers Disease

Alerts Archive

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